2019 Special Exhibit

We Are Golden: Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the Woodstock Festival and Aspirations for a Peaceful Future dives into what the youth of 1969 wanted for the world - and how their desire for change still echoes today.

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We Are Golden

The Museum at Bethel Woods presents We Are Golden, a very special exhibition that examines Woodstock and what the youth of 1969 wanted for the world, places the festival in the context of the positive societal changes it has spawned, and asks today’s youth about the changes they wish to see in the world now.  Many contemporary movements, including Concert for Bangladesh, Live Aid, Farm Aid, We Are the World, Earth Day, the Peace Movement, Women's Movement, LGBTQ Movement, #metoo, the Women's March and student gun control movement all have their roots in the 1960s. This exhibition uses the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair as a metaphor for the tumult and human response of the entire decade of the sixties in the hope that young people today may draw inspiration to articulate what it is that they want from their own world in their own time.

We Are Golden features a large collection of authentic Woodstock artifacts such as instruments, clothing, equipment, art and photography. Highlights include Jack Casady of Jefferson Airplane's bass guitar and tunic, handwritten lyrics for
"Goin' Up the Country" by Alan Wilson of Canned Heat, and a speaker cabinet and mixing equipment used by Bill Hanley at Woodstock which helped to set the standard for outdoor sound engineering

Sections within the exhibit include Voices from the Past, which presents first-person commentary about the changing canvas of American society of the 1960s from a variety of points of view. Woodstock Remembered is an artifact-rich look back at the actual three-and-a-half days of the Woodstock festival incorporating a recreated section of the stage and weaving the continuing first-person perspective begun in the first section of the exhibition. Woodstock Through the Lens brings together the best photos of the best photographers to tell the Woodstock story from an artistic, visual perspective. Finally, What the World Needs Now engages the viewer in a conversation about what they want from society today and how our experience from 50 years ago can inform our attitudes, decision-making, and actions today.

General support for The Museum at Bethel Woods is provided by members and donors and by Lazy Pond Bed and Breakfast and Rolling V Bus Corporation. 

We Are Stardust

In the Crossroads Exhibit Gallery, We Are Stardust presents objects and interpretation related to the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing, an event which took place in July of 1969 just weeks before the Woodstock Music and Art Fair. The moon landing was the most-watched event in history at that point in time. The exhibit interprets the objects and history surrounding the moon landing through the lens of American culture, examining the effect of the Cold War/Space Race, American space program, “moon mania” and the eventual national success of putting the first man on the moon on the lives of everyday Americans at the end of the tumultuous 1960s.